Our Ambassadors

We are delighted to have a number of celebrity ambassadors who all have a love for the countryside and some of whom, are directly involved with it too. Each of our ambassadors has personal connections to the countryside and each of them has different reasons for supporting us, you can find out more about each of them below.

Heston Blumenthal OBE

It is an honour to be an ambassador for The Prince’s Countryside Fund. As a chef, I am very conscientious of where our ingredients come from and British produce is some of the best there is. In the UK, 80% of our land is farmed. I think it is essential to look after both this precious resource and its keepers, ensuring high quality, tasty food and a viable farming sector in our economy. The Prince’s Countryside Fund has incredible programmes that promote just that.


Jimmy Doherty

I am very pleased to be supporting The Prince’s Countryside Fund. Being a pig farmer, I am very aware of the importance of the UK countryside and the need to ensure a more stable future for British agriculture. The Prince’s Countryside Fund has done a brilliant job to not only maintain the UK countryside but has also invested largely in its future. The fund has already supported tens of thousands of people and will go on to support thousands more.

 


 JB Gill

Since I made the career change from a popstar to a farmer, I have been able to see first hand, the impact that a rural lifestyle has had on myself and my family. I spent most of my childhood growing up in South London, unaware of the hidden beauty of the countryside and being unable to unlock the value that the rural environment can bring to every member of our society. This newfound appreciation has given me a passion to educate children and adults alike, about the processes involved in producing the food they consume, many of whom have grown up just like me, in cities, totally unaware of that journey. That is also why I am extremely driven to support the Prince's Countryside Fund, which not only helps farmers forming the bedrock of the existing rural communities in Britain, but also seeks to invest in the future of British farming, countryside and rural affairs - our young people.


Sally Gunnell OBE

Britain’s rolling green countryside is a national treasure but the custodians of this land, our farmers and rural communities are facing some serious problems. Farmers are growing older yet fewer young people are joining the industry and rural villages are losing essential services such as banks, post offices and shops. Competition from mass produced foods means that British farmers earn less for the meat and crops that they produce. The Prince’s Countryside Fund is working hard to turn this trend around which is why I am supporting them and all the work they do to help sustain the countryside that I love for the future generations.


Elizabeth Hurley

I am delighted to be an Ambassador for The Prince’s Countryside Fund as I feel passionately about the need to improve the sustainability of British farming and rural communities. I love everything about the UK countryside and have always felt strongly about supporting local village shops and post offices, and eating as much locally sourced food as possible, so it is wonderful to be involved with this Fund that provides grants to projects throughout the UK to help the rural economy.


Alex James

There are fewer finer pleasures in life than a day spent exploring the valleys, rivers, fields and woodland of the British countryside. The Prince’s Countryside Fund helps to preserve our wonderful environment, as well as support British farming, a part of my life that has absorbed me for over 10 years. I’m pleased to support The Prince’s Countryside Fund and their ongoing work to conserve our rural areas and British farming traditions. 


 Alan Titchmarsh MBE

The practical help and encouragement given by The Princes Countryside Fund to those who look after our landscape and produce our food is without equal. Sympathetic to both the environment and those who care for it, the fund really does reach parts of the countryside that would otherwise be deprived of employment, and at the same time it ensures that our natural resources are handed on to future generations in good shape. In that respect its influence is both vital and unique.


Phil Vickery MBE

The reason why I support the fund is simple, our countryside needs help! From our farmers to local communities, rural Britain needs support in so many areas and with the help of The Prince’s Countryside Fund we can start to help such a wide range of people. Our countryside is one of the most beautiful places in the world, but is under huge pressure. I want to help people, raise awareness of the problems facing these communities and make sure future generations can be as inspired by it as I have been. In rugby team talks, I used to say ‘it’s not about one of us giving an extra 10 per cent, it’s about 10 of us doing one per cent.’ Whether you live in the city, country or town, we can all do a little bit to support our countryside, and The Prince’s Countryside Fund is encouraging people to do just that as well, in addition to helping those in the countryside who need our help.


Tom Youngs

I am very passionate about the countryside and the ways in which we should try to educate everyone especially school aged children about the importance of food – how does that pint of milk develop and where does the Sunday roast come from.

Presently I am based in Leicester as a professional rugby player but I am very fortunate to be able to return to Norfolk to the families mixed arable farm. Wide open spaces, green fields, lots of flora and fauna and beautiful skies. Beautiful small rural villages with communities that have been born and bred there, generations after generations, many of whom are now finding it very difficult to make a living – we do need to support these people who care for the countryside. Many villages have lost their heart; the Post Office, the pub, the local shop – these are so important in keeping a village alive. There are some real characters in the countryside that are very clever – we must try to keep these rural skills alive – once they have gone they are gone forever.

We take everything for granted nowadays – everything is very accessible – when someone gives you a punnet of strawberries that they have grown in their own garden; the pleasure of giving and receiving is very rewarding.


 

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