Recharging Rural

Recharging Rural

 The Prince’s Countryside Fund has appointed Professor Sarah Skerratt of Scotland’s Rural College (SRUC) to conduct vital research into what can make rural communities in the UK sustainable, in spite of the adversities they face. You can read the full announcement here.

We want to find out the different ways in which the challenges of ‘remote rural’ are being experienced by people and communities across the UK.

Participants are encouraged to fill in the survey regardless of their location in the countryside – whether they live and work somewhere traditionally seen as geographically remote, or places considered ‘within easy reach’ of towns and cities but that feel remote owing to a lack of connections, such as transport, broadband, or social links.

This research project will discover what makes communities in remote rural parts of the UK sustainable, and aims to identify ways forward into 2030 and beyond.

This survey is open to everyone who lives or works in or for rural areas of the UK and  will remain open until Wednesday 18th April 2018.

Click here to access the survey in English.

Click here to access the survey in Welsh.

Click here to access the survey in Scots Gaelic.

If you have any queries, please email Ellie Jesson.

The report, Recharging Rural, will be released to coincide with National Countryside Week, Monday 30th July to Sunday 5th August 2018.

About Sarah Skerratt, Professor of Rural Society and Policy
Director, Rural Policy Centre, Scotland’s Rural College.

For the past 30 years, Prof Skerratt has been researching rural community development, specifically focusing on: rural community resilience and vulnerability, empowerment and disempowerment; rural poverty and disadvantage; rural leadership; and rural broadband as an enabler/disabler. Most recently, she has been working in the field of rural mental health with Scottish mental health charity Support in Mind Scotland.

Sarah carries out her work with the joint aims of directly enhancing rural and national policy, and making a difference in communities. Her research focuses on debunking commonly-held romantic myths around community resilience, empowerment, poverty, regeneration and development, examining differences between policy/practice vision and how this translates on the ground.

She works with the Scottish Government, Scottish Parliament, universities, private, public and third sector and development agencies in Scotland and internationally. She is on the Board of Directors for SRUC, Rural Housing Scotland and Scotland’s Regeneration Forum (SURF). In 2017, Sarah was elected as a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts (FRSA) in recognition of her work in rural policy and rural poverty.

You can follow Sarah on Twitter @sarah_skerratt and the research with the #rechargingrural

About Scotland's Rural College      

Scotland’s Rural College – winners of the Queen’s Anniversary Prize 2017 – supports innovation and sustainable development in agriculture and the rural sector in Britain and internationally. It is one of the UK’s leading agriculturally-focused higher education institutions, offering a unique blend of research, education and consultancy.

SRUC’s research and education activities operate from six campuses and eight farms and research centres across Scotland. Its consultancy arm, SAC Consulting, supports more than 12,000 farms and rural businesses across the UK from 25 consultancy offices and eight veterinary disease surveillance centres.